For even coverage white majolica glazes must be applied by dipping


Wednesday 31st July 2019

The mug on the left has three coats of Spectrum majolica base, painted on by brush from a pint jar. Drying was required after doing the inside coats, so the total glazing time was several hours. The glaze layer is way too thin and it is not even at all! The one on the right was dipped in a 5 gallon bucket-full of Arbuckle white (that was weighed out according to a recipe and slurried at 1.62 specific gravity). It took seconds to dip-apply, the thickness is good and I got very even coverage. As is obvious, it makes sense to make your own base white. Then, you can decorate using the overglaze colors (I use the Spectrum Majolica series). Another advantage of making your own white is that you can splurge on the amount of opacifier (in this case 9% zircon and 4% tin oxide), to achieve maximum whiteness and opacity. And, you can proportion a mix of two frits (having higher and lower thermal expansion) to fine tune the fit with the body (a big issue at low fire).

Pages that reference this post in the Digitalfire Reference Database:

White majolica bases have very, very low melt fluidity, Majolica, Brushing Glazes, Base-Coat Dipping Glazes


This post is one of thousands found in the Digitalfire Reference Database. Most are part of a timeline maintained by Tony Hansen. You can search that timeline on the home page of digitalfire.com.