Cone 6 rutile floating blue effect lost. Then regained.


Friday 20th December 2013

Left: What GA6-C Alberta Slip rutile blue used to look like. Middle: When it started firing wrong, the color was almost completely lost. Right: The rutile effect is back with a vengeance! What was the problem? We were adjusting firing schedules over time to find ways to reduce pinholing in other glazes and bodies. Our focus was slowing the final stages of firing and soaking there. In those efforts the key firing phase that creates the effect was lost: it happens on the way down from cone 6. This glaze needs a drop-and-soak firing (e.g. cooling 270F from cone 6, soaking, then 150F/hr drop to 1400F).

Pages that reference this post in the Digitalfire Reference Database:

GA6-C - Alberta Slip Rutile Blue Cone 6, 6% rutile is too much in this cone 6 oxidation glaze, Soaking, Plainsman Cone 6 Slow Cool (Reactive glazes)


This post is one of thousands found in the Digitalfire Reference Database. Most are part of a timeline maintained by Tony Hansen. You can search that timeline on the home page of digitalfire.com.