Roasting Ravenscrag Slip instead of calcining


Monday 6th October 2014

This is the Ravenscrag Slip I used to calcine at it 1850F (about 10lbs in a bisque vessel). I am now roasting it to 1000F instead, this produces a smoother powder, less gritty. I hold it for 2 hours at 1000F to make sure the heat penetrates. It is not actually calcining, since not all crystal water is expelled, so we call it "roasting". Why do this? Ravenscrag Slip is a clay, it shrinks. If the percentage is high enough the glaze can crack on drying (especially when applied thickly). The roast does not shrink. The idea is to tune a mix of raw and roast Ravenscrag to achieve a compromise between dry hardness and low shrinkage. Technically, Ravenscrag losses 3% of its weight on roasting so I should use 3% less. But I often swap them gram-for-gram.

Pages that reference this post in the Digitalfire Reference Database:

GR6-A - Ravenscrag Cone 6 Clear Glossy Base, GR10-A - Pure Ravenscrag Slip, Ravenscrag Slip, Sterile white vs. pure Ravenscrag Slip as a liner glaze at cone 10R, Calcine, Calcination


This post is one of thousands found in the Digitalfire Reference Database. Most are part of a timeline maintained by Tony Hansen. You can search that timeline on the home page of digitalfire.com.