GA6A Alberta Slip Base comparison using Frit 3134, 3149, 3195, FZ-16

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These columns compare the original Alberta Slip cone 6 Frit 3134 base with versions using different Ferro and Fusion Frits. Each has advantages.


Alberta Slip + Frit 3134

Code #

GA6-A

Materials Amt
Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted 40.000
Alberta Slip 40.000
Ferro Frit 3134 20.000

Total:100.00

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.48
MgO 0.24
K2O 0.09
Na2O 0.19
(KNaO) 0.28
B2O3 0.20
Al2O3 0.39
SiO2 2.70
Fe2O3 0.07

Ratios

Si:Al: 7.0:1
SiB:Al: 7.5:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

7.6 (Molar:7.2)

LOI

4.9

Notes

*The long-time cone 6 base recipe for Alberta Slip. To this are added colorants, opacifiers and variegators to create other glazes.

Although other Frits can be used to produce the honey colored base (e.g. 3195, 3249, FZ-16), this version is needed in a couple of ways we know of:

1. It is the only one that produces rutile blues in the cool-and-soak C6DHSC firing schedule (llikely because this has a lower Al2O3 level, enabling the crystallization of the TiO2 in the rutile).

2. This is also the only version that crystallizes in slow cool firings (e.g. the C6DHSC schedule).

Pictures

GA6A Alberta Slip base using Frit 3124, 3249 and 3195

The body is dark brown burning Plainsman M390 (cone 6). The amber colored glaze is 80% Alberta Slip (raw:calcine mix) with 20% of each frit. The white engobe on the inside of two of the mugs is L3954A (those mugs are glazed inside using transparent G2926B). The Alberta Slip amber gloss glaze produces an ultra-gloss surface of high quality on mugs 2 and 3 (Frit 3249 and 3195). On the outside we see it this glaze on the white slip until midway down, then on the bare red clay. The amber glaze on the first mug (with Frit 3124) has a pebbly surface that is not working nearly as well. These mugs are fired using a drop-and-soak firing schedule.

GA6-A Alberta Slip Base with tin to prevent crystallization

Left: L3820 (casting M390) with Ravenscrag Floating blue outside and Alberta Slip GA6-A inside. That inside glaze has 1% added tin, it prevents the crystals that that normally grow when this is slow cooled using the C6DHSC firing schedule (like the inside glaze on the right). These crystals can be very beautiful on decorative surfaces, but if you want a clear amber glass they are not good. Right: M390 red-burning cone 6 stoneware (P6281) with Alberta Slip Rutile blue glaze outside and GA6-A liner (the slow cooling having crystallized it). Crystallization can also be prevented by using frit 3195 or 3249 instead, they fire clear in fast or slow firings.

GA6-A Alberta Slip base crazes on P300

Fired in a cool-and-soak firing. It is better to use GA6-B (which employ Frit 3195 instead of Frit 3134).

Melted glaze for thermal expansion test has bubbled

GA6-A glaze with four frits (flow tests)

Four frits in GA6-A at cone 6

Frit 3195 (top left), 3134 (top right) 3214 (bottom left), 3249. 10 gram melt balls.

Alberta Slip on P300 with Frits 3134, 3124, 3249, 3195

This porcelain can be difficult to fit glazes to because it has a lower-than-normal silica content. Each of these test samples was thermal shock tested: 300F to ice water. Frit 3134 version (top left) crazing. 3124 slight crazing (top right). 3249 and 3195 (bottom) are uncrazed. 3134 version has the cleanest surface but 3195 is close behind. These were not slow cooled or drop-soaked during firing so they are all transparent.

Typecodes

ST-Untitled typecode

Alternate Code Number:GA6-A

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Alberta Slip + Frit 3134" id="70758" key="RQG11BiB" date="2021-12-13" typecodes="ST" codenum="GA6-A" picturebasename=""> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3134" amount="20.000" tolerance=""/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2007-03-09, Modified: 2021-12-13 15:51:55

Alberta Slip + Frit 3195

Code #

GA6-B

Materials Amt
Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted 40.000
Alberta Slip 40.000
Ferro Frit 3195 20.000

Total:100.00

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.45
MgO 0.28
K2O 0.11
Na2O 0.17
(KNaO) 0.27
TiO2 0.01
B2O3 0.23
Al2O3 0.51
SiO2 3.15
Fe2O3 0.08

Ratios

Si:Al: 6.1:1
SiB:Al: 6.6:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

7.2 (Molar:6.7)

LOI

4.9

Notes

*An alternative recipe to GA6-A (this uses Ferro Frit 3195 instead of 3134). It fires to a more brilliant glossy surface and has become of standard goto recipe.

This fires to a lower thermal expansion (by virtue of higher B2O3, Al2O3 and SiO2 levels) so will solve crazing issues on most bodies on which the GA6-A version crazes.

The chemistry in this is not compatible with the rutile blue version (see picture below). This one also does not crystallize on slow cooling the way GA6-A does.

Pictures

GA6-A base using Frit 3249 and 3195 on buff body

The body is buff-burning Plainsman M340 (cone 6). The amber-colored glaze is 80% Alberta Slip (raw:calcine mix) with 20% of each frit. The inside of mug 1 is white engobed (L3954A) and with transparent over it (G2926B). The GA6-B glaze uses Frit 3195, covering mug 2 completely. Mug 1 uses low expansion frit 3249, it fires to the same brilliant gloss. But its low expansion could cause shivering on certain bodies. These mugs are fired using a drop-and-soak firing schedule yet no micro-crystals have grown as they would using the GA6-A recipe with Frit 3134.

GA6-B Alberta Slip base glaze does not crystallize

Right: The traditional Alberta Slip amber transparent has 80% Alberta Slip and 20% Ferro Frit 3134. It forms micro-crystals if the kiln is not cooled quickly. The Frit 3195 version on the left retains its brilliant transparent nature. The reason is the higher levels of Al2O3 (Frit 3134 has almost zero Al2O3).

M390 clay with white engobe inside

L3954A engobe inside, clear glazed inside (G2926B). Outside is GA6B base (uses Frit 3195 instead of 3134). The result is a glossier more defect free glass.

P300 with AlbertaSlip:Frit 3195 glaze fires crystal-free

This glaze produces a flawless results with a normal free-fall cool cycle. But that is not what this was. In this cone 6 firing the temperature was dropped from 2200F to 2100F, held for 30 minutes, then dropped slowly (300F/hr) all the way down to 1400F. In that firing schedule the standard GA6-A base recipe would be completely covered in iron silicate crystals.

M340 with L3954B engobe, GA6-B base glaze. Cone 6.

GA6-B base Alberta Slip glaze on M340. Cone 6.

No iron oxide added.

GA6-B plus iron oxide

Top: GA6-B Bottom: Plus 1, 2, 3 and 4% iron oxide.

Alberta Slip as a Celadon at cone 6 and 10R

Left: Alberta Slip 80, Frit 3195 20. On Plainsman M370. Right: Alberta Slip/Ravenscrag Slip 50:50 mix. On Plainsman P700.

GA6-B Base does not make rutile blue

Left is the standard GA6-A with Frit 3134. GA6-B on the right has the rutile also, and was in the same firing, but the higher Al2O3 prevents its variegating action.

G3903, L3500G, GA6-B on Coffee Clay (insides)

C6DHSC firing

Typecodes

ST-Untitled typecode

Alternate Code Number:GA6-A

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Alberta Slip + Frit 3195" id="143991" key="uuyvngRN" date="2021-12-13" typecodes="ST" codenum="GA6-B" picturebasename=""> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3195" amount="20.000" tolerance=""/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2007-03-09, Modified: 2021-12-13 15:49:00

Alberta Slip + Frit 3249

Code #

L3500G

Materials Amt
Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted 40.000 39.22%
Alberta Slip 40.000 39.22%
Ferro Frit 3249 20.000 19.61%
Red Iron Oxide 2.000 1.96%

Total:102.00

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.33
MgO 0.47
K2O 0.10
Na2O 0.10
(KNaO) 0.20
B2O3 0.28
Al2O3 0.50
SiO2 2.93
Fe2O3 0.12

Ratios

Si:Al: 5.9:1
SiB:Al: 6.4:1
R2O:RO: 0.2:0.8

Expansion

6.7 (Molar:6.0)

LOI

4.9

Cost

0.07 per kg

Notes

*This is part of a program to compare the results of fluxing Alberta Slip for cone 6 using 4 different frits (3134, 3124, 3195 and 3249).

Frit 3249, used here, is a low expansion frit, it reduces the thermal expansion of the Alberta Slip base GA6-A (from 7.6 to 6.5), such that it works well on even P300 porcelain. This is the version to use if any of the others craze.

Even though this recipe calculates to a low Si:Al ratio and a very high MgO level (both indicative of a matte glaze), this one fires ultra glossy.

Since Alberta Slip is not as high in iron oxide as the original Albany Slip, we generally augment our base with red iron oxide. This produces a richer color (it does not work on the GA6-A version unless the kiln is cooled quickly to prevent crystallization). On iron bodies it fires almost black. The iron-free version of this is L3500E.

Iron has an added benefit: It gels the slurry. The 2% used here is low enough that it does not over-gel, it just produces a nicer-to-use slurry, one that goes on more evenly.

Comments

2021-12-13

Joe May 26/21 Made 2 x 500 gram powder batches of this glaze recipe. One used Fusion frit F-69 and other using Ferro frit 3249. Used 880 grams water to make a ratio of powder to water of 100/88 as per suggested GA6A recipe on Alberta Slip cone 6 recipes website page. S.G. was 1.455 for the F-69 version and 3249 version the same, just like ratio said it would be, however iron seems to have made it thicker viscosity wise like Tony said it does.

Pictures

P6851 M332 with L3500G AltaSlip 3249 base inside

P6823 M350 with L3500G AltaSlip 3249 base inside

GA6-C outside, slow cool firing.

L4115J3S cone 6 - L3500G Alberta Slip glaze

L4115J3S is a Plainsman 3D-based speckled stoneware. It is vitreous and very functional. The L3500G recipe adds 20% Ferro Frit 3249 to Alberta Slip to produce a honey glaze at cone 6 (we have added 2% iron to darken it). Inside glazes: Left mug: G2934W white matte. Right mug: G2926S, a lower thermal expansion version of G2926B, with 10% added zircopax.

L3500G with Frit 3249, F69

Identical. The F69 may have slight smoother surface.

G3903, L3500G, GA6-B on Coffee Clay (insides)

C6DHSC firing

Typecodes

ST-Untitled typecode

Alternate Code Number:GA6-A

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Alberta Slip + Frit 3249" id="193133" key="C9BRJdXA" date="2021-12-13" typecodes="ST" codenum="L3500G" picturebasename=""> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="20.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Red Iron Oxide " amount="2.000" tolerance=""/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2007-03-09, Modified: 2021-12-13 15:46:59

Alberta Slip + Frit FZ-16

Code #

G3903

Materials Amt
Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted 40.000
Alberta Slip 40.000
Fusion Frit FZ16 20.000

Total:100.00

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.33
MgO 0.26
K2O 0.10
Na2O 0.19
(KNaO) 0.29
ZnO 0.12
B2O3 0.28
Al2O3 0.40
SiO2 2.82
Fe2O3 0.08

Ratios

Si:Al: 7.1:1
SiB:Al: 7.8:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

7.4 (Molar:6.9)

LOI

4.9

Notes

*This version of the Alberta Slip base honey glaze melts the best. It works well down to cone 4. It produces an incredibly glossy surface (pieces will slide out of your hands easily if you do not hang on to them firmly, tiles cannot be stacked because they will slide off each other).

Fusion Frit FZ-16 is not easy to obtain and it is expensive. But you get what you pay for! We know of no other way to make a glossy glaze with as smooth a surface as this one has.

Pictures

GA6-A vs G3903 using FZ-16 frit at cone 6

Incredible result. Super fluid. No dimples or bubbles compared to the GA6-B on the left. The L3903 is mislabelled, should be G3903.

G3903 on P300, M340, M390

Fantastic result. Super glossy. These tiles are very slippery, cannot stack them on top of each other!

G3903, L3500G, GA6-B on Coffee Clay (insides)

C6DHSC firing

G3903 the super glossy at cone 4

This is among the glossiest surfaces we have seen. This inside surface of this bowl is so slippery that contents will slide out unless proper care is taken!

P6954 M325 with G3903 outside at cone 4 DS firing

Insides: G3936 zero frit transparent - Needs to be thicker G2936 Ravenscrag:3249 80:20: Nice surface but not as glossy as it appears on the photo G2926SX: Silky surface, needs a little more heat.

P6954, L4483B, G3903, G2917, G3936 Cone 5 SC

The glossy transparent Glaze might not be ideal for slow cool.

Typecodes

ST-Untitled typecode

Alternate Code Number:GA6-A

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Alberta Slip + Frit FZ-16" id="180298" key="hYwyxrz9" date="2021-12-13" typecodes="ST" codenum="G3903" picturebasename=""> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Alberta Slip" amount="40.000" tolerance=""/> <recipeline material="Fusion Frit FZ16" amount="20.000" tolerance=""/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2007-03-09, Modified: 2021-12-13 15:46:03