G3806 Cone 6 Fluid Melt Base Glaze Project 2019 - Stage 3 (Even Lower COE)

Share from Insight-live.com (Lab Documentation and Calculation System) by Digitalfire

See Also:
Cone 6 Fluid Melt Glaze Project 2015 - Stage 1 - Compare Popular Recipes
G3806 Cone 6 Fluid Melt Clear Glaze Project 2015 - Stage 2 (Adjust Panama Blue)

This continues the development of G3806C fluid melt cone 6 clear glaze for electric firing. The result is a melt-fluidity-adjustable clear base of very low thermal expansion. Add stains, opacifiers, variegators for stunning glazes!


Panama Cone 6 Adjustment 2015

High fluid melt glaze for reactive effects and super gloss colors

Code #

G3806C

Materials Amt
Silica 26.300 26.27%
Kaolin 19.700 19.68%
Dolomite 8.700 8.69%
Strontium Carbonate 4.400 4.40%
Ferro Frit 3110 31.100 31.07%
Ferro Frit 3134 6.600 6.59%
Zinc Oxide 3.300 3.30%

Total:100.10

Auto Unity Formula + Analysis

CaO 0.33 5.89%
MgO 0.15 1.90%
K2O 0.02 0.73%
Na2O 0.27 5.40%
(KNaO) 0.30
ZnO 0.13 3.30%
SrO 0.09 3.09%
B2O3 0.11 2.32%
Al2O3 0.28 9.19%
SiO2 3.16 60.26%

Ratios

Si:Al: 11.1:1
SiB:Al: 11.5:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

7.3

LOI

7.9

Cost

65.68 per kg

Notes

This is work I did in 2015.
The copper and tin to produce the turquoise celadon effect are not included in the recipe shown (3% copper carb, 2.5% tin oxide).

This recipe is for a brilliant fluid-melt transparent base glaze, initially for copper blues and greens, but later for stains. "Fluid-melt" means it runs down off ware if applied too thickly, this is a key for achieving many visual effects.

Initiailly I compared a number of recipes I found on line and finally selected Panama Blue. I removed the colorants and made adjustments to improve slurry properties and lower the thermal expansion (it has serious crazing issues). Fluid-melts have a down side: Crazing is an issue (because the fluid melt requires more fluxes, these have higher thermal expansions).

Then I did three adjustments, each lowering the thermal expansion more than the last. While keeping the same brilliant visual appearance. The recipe ended up being quite different (two materials were eliminated from the recipe, their oxides supplied by the others). The chemistry of this one moves much of the KNaO to low-expansion MgO. This makes it melt a little less, but visually it is the same. Higher ZnO helps melting (since MgO is not nearly as powerful a flux as KNaO). I was even able to add extra SiO2. The calculated thermal expansion has gone from 7.7 down to 7.3.

This worked well on stonewares but still crazed on Plainsman P300 and M370 (but was OK on Polar Ice). Fluid melt glazes look best on porcelains so this was obviously a problem. So I continued development in pursuit of a fluid melt having a lower thermal expansion (see subsequent articles, recipes and posts).

Pictures

Copper Blue G8306C using copper carbonate, oxide

Right is G3806C, an adjustment to drop the thermal expansion of B. It does this by trading some of the high-expansion KNaO for a mix of MgO, ZnO and SrO. These is an improvement but it still could craze over time on high-kaolin or low silica porcelains.

One more change: The one on the right uses 2% Copper Oxide instead of 2% Copper Carbonate (left). Both also add 2.5% tin oxide. Strangely the color is only slight darker (the oxide is a more concentrated form of copper than the carbonate).

Plainsman P300, M370 with copper blue glaze cone 6

This is the G3906C base plus 2.5% tin oxide and 2% copper oxide. The green glaze does craze over time on these bodies, but the inside glaze is a liner than will not.

3806C vs. other cone 6 clear glazes on a dark stoneware

Each pair of mugs shows a numbered glaze vs. G3806C on the right. The body is a red burning cone 6 stoneware, Plainsman M390.

G2926B, 3806C vs. Amaco C11 Clear at cone 6

Bottom right is P300 with three coats of C11.
Bottom left: 10 gram ball of C11.
2926 B is top left, 3806C is top right.

G3806C Copper Blue on Polar Ice

Polar Ice is the easiest of Plainsman middle fire porcelains to fit a glaze to, although this glaze crazes on most other porcelains, it should stay craze free on this.

G3806C on a dark burning cone 6 stoneware

Plainsman M390. There is still some clouding, but it is better than other transparents we have used.

Variations

1 - Midnight

Fire fast to 2100F (300-400F/hr), then 100F/hr to 2200F, then drop fast to 2000F and soak half hour, then cool at 100F/hr to 1400F.

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Panama Cone 6 Adjustment 2015" keywords="High fluid melt glaze for reactive effects and super gloss colors" id="75786" key="sRQ9NRRN" date="2019-08-31" codenum="G3806C" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="26.300"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="19.700"/> <recipeline material="Dolomite" amount="8.700"/> <recipeline material="Strontium Carbonate" amount="4.400"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3110" amount="31.100"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3134" amount="6.600"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="3.300"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-08-31 12:13:47

Panama c6 - Lower COE #1

Code #

G3806D

P Materials Amt
Silica 26.300 26.27%
Wollastonite 4.000 4.00%
Kaolin 15.700 15.68%
Dolomite 5.700 5.69%
Strontium Carbonate 4.400 4.40%
Ferro Frit 3110 29.100 29.07%
Ferro Frit 3249 5.600 5.59%
Zinc Oxide 3.300 3.30%
Spodumene 6.000 5.99%
P Additions Amt
* Copper Carbonate 3.000 3.00%
* Tin Oxide 2.500 2.50%

Total:105.60

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.32
Li2O 0.05
MgO 0.15
K2O 0.02
Na2O 0.23
(KNaO) 0.25
ZnO 0.13
SrO 0.09
B2O3 0.11
Al2O3 0.30
SiO2 3.29

Ratios

Si:Al: 10.8:1
SiB:Al: 11.2:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

6.9

LOI

6.0

Cost

65.68 per kg

Notes

The first adjustment to G3806C, the recipe I have used by some years. I have reduced KNaO and raised Li2O to compensate (Li2O is a powerful flux and has very low expansion). The method to accomplish this is novel.

-Some of the KNaO and almost all of the B2O3 were coming from frit 3134. I removed that and introduced frit 3249. It has no KNaO, plenty of B2O3. But it also has MgO (another low expansion flux). The portion of the MgO that I can supply in-the-frit will melt much better than it does when supplied from dolomite.

-I am sourcing the Li2O from spodumene. Not much is needed because I only need 0.05 molar.

The chemistries of the copper and tin are turned off so they are not participating.

The results have been stunning so far. The fired appearance is almost identical. However it is still crazing on Plainsman P300.

Mixed 2700 water to 3000 dry to get 1.45 SG. Does not respond well to Epsom salts, even at 2g/1000. Slurry is pretty runny but does work fine on quick dips with 1850F bisque. Needs some bentonite to increase particle surface area.

Pictures

G2806D (with copper carbonate) on M340 at cone 6

G2806D melt flow test

Left is G3806C with copper oxide 2%. Right is G3806D with copper carbonate 2%. The melt fluidity is identical.bith are bubbling so the C might’ve carbonate also.

G3806D with 2% Copper Car (left), 2% Copper Oxide (right)

G3806C and D - both using Copper Oxide at 2%

G3806D on M340, Polar Ice at cone 6

G3806D on M340, M390 at cone 6

This is the copper oxide version.

Clockwise: G3806C,D,E,F on M370

F is more fluid, thus highlights contours better.
C has 2% copper, the others 3%.

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Panama c6 - Lower COE #1" id="157007" key="MTwbCnwP" date="2019-07-20" codenum="G3806D" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="26.300"/> <recipeline material="Wollastonite" amount="4.000"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="15.700"/> <recipeline material="Dolomite" amount="5.700"/> <recipeline material="Strontium Carbonate" amount="4.400"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3110" amount="29.100"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="5.600"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="3.300"/> <recipeline material="Spodumene" amount="6.000"/> <recipeline material="Copper Carbonate" amount="3.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-07-20 20:55:12

Panama c6 - Lower COE #2

Code #

G3806E

P Materials Amt
Silica 32.000
Bentonite 2.000
Kaolin 11.000
Dolomite 8.000
Strontium Carbonate 5.000
Ferro Frit 3110 22.000
Ferro Frit 3249 6.000
Zinc Oxide 3.000
Spodumene 11.000
P Additions Amt
* Copper Oxide 4.000
* Tin Oxide 2.500

Total:106.50

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.24
Li2O 0.10
MgO 0.21
K2O 0.02
Na2O 0.19
(KNaO) 0.21
ZnO 0.12
SrO 0.11
B2O3 0.11
Al2O3 0.31
SiO2 3.56

Ratios

Si:Al: 11.4:1
SiB:Al: 11.7:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

6.3

LOI

6.9

Cost

80.00 per kg

Notes

This takes the calculated COE even lower (6.9 of G3806D to 6.3). I have increased Li2O, MgO at the expense of KNaO and CaO.

This produces a stunning copper blue/green. While it is still failing the 300F/ice-water test on P300, the calculated thermal expansion of 6.3 (vs. the original 7.3 in G3806C) means that this would fit many bodies. The advantage that this has over subsequent versions is:

-It has kept the B2O3 low
-It does not need an exotic frit, it works with just Spodumene to source the Li2O and strontium carbonate for the SrO. While some of the MgO is sourced from a frit, most is still coming from inexpensive dolomite.
-The total frit percentage is only 28%.

Pictures

G3806E on Polar Ice - Cone 6

I think you will agree, this is stunning! And the melt fluidity is about right: I have it on pretty thick and yet it has not run on to the kiln shelf. Can you imagine what this is going to look like when I replace the copper with red stain!

Clockwise: G3806C,D,E,F on M370

F is more fluid, thus highlights contours better.
C has 2% copper, the others 3%.

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Panama c6 - Lower COE #2" id="157465" key="QugJids4" date="2019-07-20" codenum="G3806E" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="32.000"/> <recipeline material="Bentonite" amount="2.000"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="11.000"/> <recipeline material="Dolomite" amount="8.000"/> <recipeline material="Strontium Carbonate" amount="5.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3110" amount="22.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="6.000"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="3.000"/> <recipeline material="Spodumene" amount="11.000"/> <recipeline material="Copper Oxide" amount="4.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-07-20 21:53:03

Panama c6 - Lower COE #3

Code #

G3806F

P Materials Amt
Silica 23.500
Wollastonite 7.000
Kaolin 10.000
Strontium Carbonate 5.000
Ferro Frit 3110 22.000
Ferro Frit 3249 21.000
Zinc Oxide 3.000
Bentonite 2.500
Spodumene 6.000
P Additions Amt
* Copper Carbonate 4.000
* Tin Oxide 2.500

Total:106.50

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.32
Li2O 0.05
MgO 0.21
K2O 0.02
Na2O 0.18
(KNaO) 0.20
ZnO 0.12
SrO 0.11
B2O3 0.31
Al2O3 0.31
SiO2 3.28

Ratios

Si:Al: 10.7:1
SiB:Al: 11.7:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

6.3

LOI

3.0

Cost

58.75 per kg

Notes

This version tests a new concept: Introduce more B2O3 (tripling the amount), boron is a glass super-melter. The downside is that this means more frit is needed, that increases the price. But is also means that less Li2O might be needed.

If the melt fluidity increases enough it will permits increasing Al2O3 and SiO2. That is exactly what has happened. This is running much more, even though the Li2O (a very strong flux) is only half what it was.

The calculated COE is the same as the last one, E. And fails the 300F/icewater test on P300 also. Next step: Increase SiO2 and Al2O3.

Pictures

Clockwise: G3806C,D,E,F on M370

F is more fluid, thus highlights contours better.
C has 2% copper, the others 3%.

G3806E and F Flow Test

F is flowing better than any previous, likely because of the higher boron. This will permit adding silica, which will lower thermal expansion even more.
The E version is distinctly lacking in bubbles, this is the best looking flow of anything tested.

G3806E (left), G3806F (right)

E uses 4% copper oxide, F 4% copper carbonante.
On Polar Ice casting body, cone 6.

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Panama c6 - Lower COE #3" id="157668" key="CwAAYWhw" date="2019-07-20" codenum="G3806F" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="23.500"/> <recipeline material="Wollastonite" amount="7.000"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="10.000"/> <recipeline material="Strontium Carbonate" amount="5.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3110" amount="22.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="21.000"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="3.000"/> <recipeline material="Bentonite" amount="2.500"/> <recipeline material="Spodumene" amount="6.000"/> <recipeline material="Copper Carbonate" amount="4.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-07-20 21:57:19

Panama c6 - Lower COE #6

Code #

G3806J

P Materials Amt
Silica 27.000
Wollastonite 5.500
Kaolin 11.000
Strontium Carbonate 4.500
Ferro Frit 3110 17.000
Ferro Frit 3249 19.000
Zinc Oxide 3.000
Bentonite 2.500
Spodumene 10.500
P Additions Amt
* Copper Carbonate 4.000
* Tin Oxide 2.500

Total:106.50

Auto Unity Formula

CaO 0.28
Li2O 0.10
MgO 0.21
K2O 0.02
Na2O 0.15
(KNaO) 0.17
ZnO 0.13
SrO 0.11
B2O3 0.30
Al2O3 0.38
SiO2 3.75

Ratios

Si:Al: 9.8:1
SiB:Al: 10.6:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

5.9

LOI

3.0

Cost

67.50 per kg

Notes

This version, J, is a regression from a blind alley met in G an H. The G3806F boron-increasing test produced more melting so I added just SiO2, concluding that since it is the glass former, an even more brilliant surface would result. That did not happen.

In this one I have restored the Li2O to "E" levels; added Al2O3, SiO2; reduced CaO and KNaO. This takes the COE down to an amazing 5.9.

This is melting well but it has entrained bubbles that are affecting the glossiness of the surface (likely from the strontium or spodumene). I added 2% zircon, thinking it would act as a fining agent. But that did not happen. Still, this is working well on dark burning bodies.

I am getting close: Cone 6 Plainsman P300 mugs survive a 325F to ice water test with only a small amount of crazing.

Pictures

G3806J, J1 melt fluidy test

J1 (with 2% zircon) is not melting as much.

L3806J Cone 6 with 10% Mason 6021 red stain

Working quite well, no evidence of bubbles.
But could be glossier. Needs a little more stain for brighter red.

G3806J1 on P300 - cone 6

Drop-and-hold slow cool firing. Not quite as glossy as desired. Crazed after two weeks.

L3806J on M390 (drop-and-hold, slow cool firing)

L3806J on M340, M390, Coffee clay

Normal cooling, cone 6. Drop and soak.

G3806J on M390, Coffee clay at cone 6

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Panama c6 - Lower COE #6" id="158261" key="rBFouPfD" date="2019-08-08" codenum="G3806J" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="27.000"/> <recipeline material="Wollastonite" amount="5.500"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="11.000"/> <recipeline material="Strontium Carbonate" amount="4.500"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3110" amount="17.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="19.000"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="3.000"/> <recipeline material="Bentonite" amount="2.500"/> <recipeline material="Spodumene" amount="10.500"/> <recipeline material="Copper Carbonate" amount="4.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-08-08 14:40:08

Panama c6 - Lower COE #7

Code #

G3806K

P Materials Amt
Silica 21.500
Bentonite 2.000
Kaolin 7.000
Ferro Frit 3249 17.000
Zinc Oxide 2.500
Fusion Frit F-524 42.500
Fusion Frit F-493 7.500
P Additions Amt
* Copper Carbonate 4.000
* Tin Oxide 2.500

Total:106.50

Auto Unity Formula

BaO 0.02
CaO 0.25
Li2O 0.11
MgO 0.20
K2O 0.06
Na2O 0.11
(KNaO) 0.18
ZnO 0.12
SrO 0.12
B2O3 0.61
Al2O3 0.38
SiO2 3.92

Ratios

Si:Al: 10.4:1
SiB:Al: 12.0:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

5.8

LOI

1.1

Cost

53.75 per kg

Notes

This version makes a bold change: Doubling the B2O3. And raises the SiO2 somewhat.
And another bold change: Sourcing Li2O and SrO from Fusion frits. This doubles the percentage of frit in the recipe. Why? I want a consistently crystal-clear glass. The very best way to get that is to reduce materials that have a weight loss on firing (like strontium, kaolin) and maximize frit content.

This is certainly the most fluid so far.
It is an exciting step because the Al2O3 and SiO2 are high (making it likely to be durable) but the fluidity leaves room to raise them much higher! That will nudge the thermal expansion even lower.

The 7% koalin seems to be adequate for suspending the slurry because it is assisted by 2% bentonite.

Pictures

G3806K on M370, Coffee clay

Crystal clear, running nicely.

G3806K ball pool - some bubbles

Now that is melt fluidity! G3806K with and without copper

This is clearly running much better than any previous. Much fewer bubbles. Even some crystallization on lower flow. More Al2O3 will reduce that.

G3806K on Polar Ice - really running

It is pooled in the bottom of the mug. Polar Ice.
This survived 325F to ice water without crazing!

G3806K on coffee clay

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="Panama c6 - Lower COE #7" id="158673" key="gdyZNXpC" date="2019-08-08" codenum="G3806K" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="21.500"/> <recipeline material="Bentonite" amount="2.000"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="7.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="17.000"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="2.500"/> <recipeline material="Fusion Frit F-524" amount="42.500"/> <recipeline material="Fusion Frit F-493" amount="7.500"/> <recipeline material="Copper Carbonate" amount="4.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-08-08 14:36:32

C6 Fluid Clear Final Recipe #10

Code #

G3806N

P Materials Amt
Silica 17.500 17.33%
Bentonite 1.000 0.99%
Kaolin 17.000 16.83%
Ferro Frit 3249 16.000 15.84%
Zinc Oxide 2.500 2.48%
Fusion Frit F-524 40.000 39.60%
Fusion Frit F-493 7.000 6.93%
P Additions Amt
* Black Copper Oxide 4.000 3.96%
* Tin Oxide 2.500 2.48%

Total:107.50

Auto Unity Formula

BaO 0.02
CaO 0.25
Li2O 0.11
MgO 0.20
K2O 0.06
Na2O 0.11
(KNaO) 0.17
ZnO 0.13
SrO 0.12
B2O3 0.61
Al2O3 0.54
SiO2 4.02

Ratios

Si:Al: 7.5:1
SiB:Al: 8.6:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

5.8

LOI

2.2

Cost

43.32 per kg

Notes

Jackpot! In an intervening step I increased the Al2O3 from .38 to .45. It this one to 0.54.
That means I have been able to almost double the amount of Al2O3 (from G3806C) while maintaining fluidity. And SiO2 is 25% higher. And the thermal expansion calculates to an incredible 5.8 (compared to the original Panama blue which was 7.7)!

The kaolin is the adjuster here. Reduce it by 5 and the melt fluidity will increase significantly. Yet it will still have a low COE.

You will not be able to get these frits (although not shown here, I want to use Fusion F-69 instead of Ferro 3249, being intended for ceramics it is more reliable). We plan to bringing these frits in at Plainsman Clays and begin making this recipe, as a powder, soon. I will do my best to make purchase of kilogram amounts possible on line. What is your best option until then? Consider making the G3806E or F. Make sure they fit your clay body. Do a 300F to ice-water test to be sure.

Pictures

Lemon slice test on G3806N

Left this for 24 hours. Wrapped up in stretch wrap.
No indication of leaching.

G3806N P300 mug

This withstands a 325F to ice water test without crazing on P300, a very difficult-to-fit-glazes-to body.

G3806N on M370, M340, M390, Coffee

Cone 6 drop and soak, slow cool firing.
Jackpot! Looks great. Appears to be running less yet still exhibits the dramatic color changes associated with its mobility on contoured surfaces.

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="C6 Fluid Clear Final Recipe #10" id="159060" key="6aBagHsS" date="2019-07-20" codenum="G3806N" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="17.500"/> <recipeline material="Bentonite" amount="1.000"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="17.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="16.000"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="2.500"/> <recipeline material="Fusion Frit F-524" amount="40.000"/> <recipeline material="Fusion Frit F-493" amount="7.000"/> <recipeline material="Black Copper Oxide" amount="4.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-07-20 22:46:26

C6 Fluid Clear Final #10 Using Spodumene

Code #

G3806PS

P Materials Amt
Silica 16.500
Bentonite 2.000
Kaolin 9.000
Ferro Frit 3249 17.500
Zinc Oxide 2.500
Fusion Frit F-524 35.500
Spodumene 10.000
Ferro Frit 3110 7.000
P Additions Amt
* Copper Oxide 4.000
* Tin Oxide 2.500

Total:106.50

Auto Unity Formula

BaO 0.02
CaO 0.26
Li2O 0.11
MgO 0.22
K2O 0.05
Na2O 0.12
(KNaO) 0.17
ZnO 0.12
SrO 0.10
B2O3 0.55
Al2O3 0.50
SiO2 4.06

Ratios

Si:Al: 8.1:1
SiB:Al: 9.2:1
R2O:RO: 0.3:0.7

Expansion

5.7

LOI

1.3

Cost

41.25 per kg

Notes

Until we can get Frit 493 in stock this recipe can be used instead of G3806N, this sources the Li2O from Spodumene.

Could not get as much B2O3 so dropping Al2O3/SiO2 a little also. But the COE is still 5.7.

This does not smooth out as well as the N, it has to be slow cooled (schedule C6DHSC).

Pictures

G3806PS on P300

Inside glaze is crystal clear, survived thermal shock test. Looks great.

G3806PS on on M370, Coffee

Crystal clear, very nice

G3806M vs G3806P flow test - About cone 2-3

Amazing how much this is melting and it is nowhere near cone 6 (the kiln errored out).

G3806P on L4205, L4207, L4197, L4202, L4203, L4204, L4198, L4200, L4201

Fired cone 6, drop and soak slow cool firing.
Very good transparent on all.
All passed 325F to icewater test without crazing.

Fired twice, first firing was just drop and soak, but surface orange-peeled, second firing with slow cool smoothed it out.

G3806 C,D,E,F,G,K,L,M,N,P1,PS Glazed tiles

All fired drop and soak slow cool.

G3806P-Li and 3806P-S flow test compare

The spodumene version is more fluid than the lithium version!

G3806PS on M370, M340, M390, Coffee at cone 4

Drop and hold, slow cool firing.
Excellent glossy surface. However lots of microbubbles in Coffee Clay and 390.

G3806PS with Crysanthos underglazes - Working great!

The body is Plainsman M370 (not M340 as stamped).
C6DHSC slow cool firing schedule.
Some colors are bleeding, if needed add kaolin to make this glaze little less fluid. The rose color, #093, (not shown) is not working because it likely employs a chrome-tin stain, these have requirements: A clear glaze having a minimum amount of CaO, no ZnO and not too much B2O3 (this glaze does not qualify). But no transparent glaze works with all underglazes. You could find others that work with #093 but they could cloud, craze, crawl and not be glossy enough. The other orange/pink colors here are working. Why? Because they likely employ inclusion stains. A key factor is that the black is working well, even when applied over the white underglaze.

G3806PS on M340 at cone 4, G2926B on M340 at cone 6

XML (to paste into Insight)

<?xml version="1.0"?> <recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> <recipe name="C6 Fluid Clear Final #10 Using Spodumene" id="159279" key="ttXP3nmN" date="2019-08-29" codenum="G3806PS" email="untdkm@sasktel.net"> <recipelines> <recipeline material="Silica" amount="16.500"/> <recipeline material="Bentonite" amount="2.000"/> <recipeline material="Kaolin" amount="9.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3249" amount="17.500"/> <recipeline material="Zinc Oxide" amount="2.500"/> <recipeline material="Fusion Frit F-524" amount="35.500"/> <recipeline material="Spodumene" amount="10.000"/> <recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3110" amount="7.000"/> <recipeline material="Copper Oxide" amount="4.000" added="true"/> <recipeline material="Tin Oxide" amount="2.500" added="true"/> </recipelines> </recipe> </recipes>

Born: 2015-06-02, Modified: 2019-08-29 10:38:30